EARLY REVIEWS OF

CONDOR AND HUMMINGBIRD

Written for the lost children of the world, not just of Colombia, this first novel affectingly entwines the lives of three women (one an American, two Colombian) caught up in a struggle for freedom. Sisterhood--both practical and mystical-- is the ideal that sustains them.  Ms. Magazine
Charlotte [Zoe Walker]'s style is lyrical, even mythical, and fragmentary. . . [she] argues that a people's past is indelible, that each people has its own invincible and inescapable character,and that each of us, regardless of our nationality, is a foreigner.  American Book Review
Laura finds in herself a new determination to overcome the obstacles of these dire circumstances, not by forging the violent revolution that she and her husband once fantasized, but a "smalll revolution." It would begin with . . . three women, three sisters, and it would be founded on love. 
       Ana Castillo, San Francisco Chronicle
MENDEZ [WALKER] reads like herself and no one else. Laura's clumsy thrusts toward intimacy, her failure to achieve it, and their irritation with her are sadly and subtly written.
         Australia, Sydney Morning Herald 
Wonderful writing. . . . captures the era perfectly.
          Daniel Menaker
Mysterious and Clear all at the same time, and beautifully written.    Grace Paley